deathbeforedarkroast

deathbeforedarkroast:

weirdedout:

ikeapunx:

muji spice book

Traveling with your spice rack is not ideal. This is why Japanese company, Muji, has made a book of spices to make flavoring your food while away from home a little bit easier.

This book from Muji is full of pages that are made of spiced paper, which dissolve from the heat and moisture of cooking. Now that kick of white pepper or red chili is just a tear away. And, since it is compact and perfectly portable, the Muji spice book is ideal for when you’re traveling!

Omg

First: formulate instant coffee that is not utter trash.

Second: Coffee book.

fleshcoatedtechnology

sixpenceee:

A graduate student has created the first man-made biological leaf. It absorbs water and carbon dioxide to produce oxygen just like a plant. He did this by suspending chloroplasts in a mixture made out of silk protein. He believed it can be used for many things but the most striking one is the thought that it could be used for long distance space travel. Plants do not grow in space, but this synthetic material can be used to produce oxygen in a hostile environment. (Video)

fleshcoatedtechnology
laboratoryequipment:

Natural Soundscapes May Become ‘Digital Fossils’Sounds are integral to Henry David Thoreau’s “Walden,” the book about two years he spent living in a cabin in the woods near Walden Pond in Massachusetts in 1846-47 — the wind blowing through the rushes, the rumbling of the ice melting in the spring, owls screeching in the night.Oh, and the whistle of the steam engines from passing trains and church bells ringing in Concord on Sundays, miles away. Thoreau went to Walden to live simply amid nature. The sounds of humanity followed him. Now, there is hardly a spot on the planet where our noise doesn’t mix with (or intrude on, from another perspective) the sounds of the natural world, says Purdue Univ. Prof. Bryan Pijanowski.Eventually, the only way people may be able to hear nature on its own terms is through an artificial digital world, much like “Star Trek,” says Pijanowski, an ecologist leading a Purdue-centered international effort to collect a digital archive of high-resolution video — and especially sound — from signature natural areas around the world.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/09/natural-soundscapes-may-become-%E2%80%98digital-fossils%E2%80%99

laboratoryequipment:

Natural Soundscapes May Become ‘Digital Fossils’

Sounds are integral to Henry David Thoreau’s “Walden,” the book about two years he spent living in a cabin in the woods near Walden Pond in Massachusetts in 1846-47 — the wind blowing through the rushes, the rumbling of the ice melting in the spring, owls screeching in the night.

Oh, and the whistle of the steam engines from passing trains and church bells ringing in Concord on Sundays, miles away. Thoreau went to Walden to live simply amid nature. The sounds of humanity followed him. Now, there is hardly a spot on the planet where our noise doesn’t mix with (or intrude on, from another perspective) the sounds of the natural world, says Purdue Univ. Prof. Bryan Pijanowski.

Eventually, the only way people may be able to hear nature on its own terms is through an artificial digital world, much like “Star Trek,” says Pijanowski, an ecologist leading a Purdue-centered international effort to collect a digital archive of high-resolution video — and especially sound — from signature natural areas around the world.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/09/natural-soundscapes-may-become-%E2%80%98digital-fossils%E2%80%99